Recent research on the spread and diversification of English has convincingly shown that mobility, mediatization and technologization have profoundly changed how English is used throughout the globe. People can participate in networks of communication around the world that are unprecedented in scale and scope. As a consequence, the distinction between ‘native’ and ‘non-native’ has begun to lose much of its earlier meaning, and it is now clear that “what dominates the linguistic ecology of the world today is not one standard language but the whole English language complex” (Mair 2013: 275). The predominance of second language and non-native use of English means that it is increasingly used in environments that are inherently multilingual, and it features strongly among today’s highly mobile speakers, subjecting it to particularly intense and varied language contact. Periods of increased mobility typically result in accelerated language change, thus we may expect rapid changes in global Englishes.

Much of previous research on English is based on synchronic and highly structured sources of data that are used in a variety of research paradigms. They include studies of regional variation in World Englishes, of ongoing change in Standard English, learner use of English, and the study of English as a lingua franca (ELF). However, mediatization and technologization have led to the emergence of new types of data sources that could complement these traditional data. Various applications, such as Twitter, have turned the web into a user-generated repository of information in ever-increasing numbers of areas, and various ‘big data’ approaches have started tapping into these less structured sources.

Our research group seeks to understand the complexities of language contact and emerging grammatical variability in the digital age. Our aim is to integrate two types of empirical data. We not only rely on traditional structured data as is commonly done but also utilize unstructured data sources that are often large in size and rich in metadata, such as evidence from various social media platforms. This cross-fertilization of traditional and novel methods and data can be used to provide innovative answers to familiar questions in English linguistics and enable tracing to what extent second language and non-native uses are shaped by the same natural evolutionary processes that affect the established native varieties.

EvolvE focuses on e.g.

  • English as a native, a second, a foreign language;
  • English as a lingua franca;
  • Grammatical variability in Englishes across time and space;
  • Grammatical variability in non-native use through time;
  • Non-native English data in space;
  • Data-mining and new digital tools in the study of evolving Englishes.

 

Members

Izabela Czerniak (UEF)

Markku Filppula (UEF)

Mark Kaunisto (UTA)

Juhani Klemola (TaY, head of research group)

Mikko Laitinen (UEF, head of research group)

Lea Meriläinen (UEF)

Hanna Parviainen (UTA)

Heli Paulasto (UEF)

Paula Rautionaho (UEF)

Paul Rickman (UTA)

Juhani Rudanko (UTA)

 

Projects

Paula Rautionaho: Cultural encounters leading to linguistic change: A corpus-driven investigation of tense and aspect in the English language complex. 2018-2020. University of Eastern Finland.

 

Publications

2018. Rickman, Paul & Juhani Rudanko. Corpus-based Studies on Non-finite Complements in Recent English. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

2017. Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola & Devyani Sharma (Eds.). The Oxford Handbook of World Englishes. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2017. Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola, Anna Mauranen & Svetlana Vechinnikova (Eds.) Changing English: Global and Local Perspectives. (Topics in English Linguistics [TiEL] 92). Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton.

2017. Filppula, Markku& Juhani Klemola. “The definite article in World Englishes”. In Filppula et al. (Eds.), Changing English: Global and Local Perspectives. (Topics in English Linguistics [TiEL] 92). Berlin: de Gruyter Mouton, 155–168.

2017. Kaunisto, Mark & Juhani Rudanko. “At -ing and on -ing: Comparing two sentential complements of the verb work”. In Sebastian Hoffmann, Andrea Sand & Sabine Arndt-Lappe (Eds), Exploring Recent Diachrony: Corpus Studies of Lexicogrammar and Language Practices in Late Modern English. Studies in Variation, Contacts and Change in English 18. Helsinki: VariEng.

2017. Meriläinen, Lea. “The progressive form in learner Englishes: Examining variation across corpora”. World Englishes. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1111/weng.12244.

2017. Meriläinen Lea & Heli Paulasto. “Embedded inversion as an angloversal: Evidence from Inner, Outer and Expanding Circle Englishes”. In Filppula et al. (Eds), The Oxford Handbook of World Englishes. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 676-696.

2017. Meriläinen, Lea, Heli Paulasto & Paula Rautionaho. “Extended uses of the progressive form in Inner, Outer and Expanding Circle Englishes”. In Filppula et al. (Eds), Changing English: Global and Local Perspectives. Topics in English Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 191-216.

2017. Parviainen, Hanna. “Omission of direct objects in New Englishes”. In Filppula et al. (Eds.), Changing English: Global and Local Perspectives. Topics in English Linguistics. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

2017. Rickman, Paul. “Aspects of verb complementation in New Zealand newspaper English”. In Filppula et al. (Eds.), Changing English: Global and Local Perspectives. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 169-190.

2017. Rudanko, Juhani. Infinitives and Gerunds in Recent English: Studies on Non-Finite Complements with Data from Large Corpora. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

2014. Filppula, Markku & Juhani Klemola. “Celtic influence in English: a re-evaluation”. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen CXV:1, 33–53.

2013. Klemola, Juhani. “English as a contact language in the British Isles”. In Schreier, Daniel & Marianne Hundt (Eds.), English as a Contact Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 75-87.

 

Forthcoming publications

Deshors, Sandra C. & Paula Rautionaho. Forthcoming. “The progressive vs. non-progressive alternation: A semantic exploration across World Englishes”. To appear in English World-Wide.

Kaunisto, Mark, Mikko Höglund & Paul Rickman (Eds.) Forthcoming. Changing Structures: Studies in Constructions and Complementation. Studies in Language Companion Series 195. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Kaunisto, Mark. Forthcoming. “Structures, patterns, constructions – studying variation and change in lexico-grammar”. In Kaunisto et al. (Eds.), Changing Structures: Studies in Constructions and Complementation. Studies in Language Companion Series 195. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Kaunisto, Mark & Juhani Rudanko. Forthcoming. “Advise against -ing: an Emerging Class of Exceptions to Bach’s Generalization”. To appear in a collection edited by Michaela Mahlberg & Viola Wiegand, and published in Mouton de Gruyter’s Language and Discourse series.

Kaunisto, Mark & Juhani Rudanko. Forthcoming. “Warn against -ing: Exceptions to Bach’s Generalization in Four Varieties of English”. To appear in a collection edited by Terttu Nevalainen, Irma Taavitsainen and Carla Suhr, and published by Brill.

Meriläinen, Lea. Forthcoming. “The progressive form and its functions in spoken learner English: Tracing the effects of an exposure-rich learning environment”. To appear in the International Journal of Learner Corpus Research, a special issue “Tense and aspect in learner language: Issues and advances in the use of language corpora” (guest-edited by Valentin Werner & Robert Fuchs).

Paulasto, Heli & Robert Penhallurick. Forthcoming. Welsh English. Boston, Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Rautionaho, Paula & Sandra C. Deshors. Forthcoming. “Progressive or not progressive? Modelling constructional choices in EFL and ESL”. To appear in the International Journal of Learner Corpus Research: A Special Issue on Tense and Aspect in Learner Language.

Rautionaho, Paula, Sandra C. Deshors & Lea Meriläinen. Forthcoming. “Revisiting the ENL-ESL-EFL continuum debate: A multifactorial approach to grammatical aspect in spoken English”. To appear in the ICAME Journal. 

Rickman, Paul & Mark Kaunisto. Forthcoming. “Aspects of the use of the transitive into -ing pattern in New Zealand English”. In Kaunisto et al. (Eds.), Changing Structures: Studies on Complementation and Constructions. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.